March 29, 2020

100 Books Every Man Should Read

Reading allows you to borrow someone else’s brain. It makes you smarter, richer intellectually, more interesting, and a better person.

So here’s an eclectically curated list, albeit slanted by my personal preferences, of books that every man should read — replacing a handful of the obvious classics with a few obscure choices, and a few books left off lists in the name of political correctness:

  1. The Sun Also Rises — Ernest Hemingway
  2. Lonesome Dove — Larry McMurtry
  3. Dubliners — James Joyce
  4. Bonfire of the Vanities — Tom Wolfe
  5. The Collected Poetry of William Butler Yeats — William Butler Yeats
  6. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest — Ken Kesey
  7. The Road — Cormac McCarthy
  8. Manual for Living — Epictetus
  9. A River Runs Through It — Norman MacLean
  10. Meditations — Marcus Aurelius
  11. The Private Life of Chairman Mao — Li Zhi-Sui
  12. The Picture Of Dorian Grey — Oscar Wilde
  13. God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater — Kurt Vonnegut
  14. A Confederacy of Dunces — John Kennedy Toole
  15. Hard Times — Charles Dickens
  16. Infinite Jest — David Foster Wallace
  17. The Book of Deeds of Arms and Chivalry — Christine de Pizan
  18. The Big Rich — Bryan Burrough
  19. The Brothers Karamazov — Fyodor Dostoevsky
  20. Fahrenheit 451 — Ray Bradbury
  21. The Odyssey — Homer
  22. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Series — Douglas Adams
  23. Catch-22 — Joseph Heller
  24. Candide — Voltaire
  25. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas — Hunter S. Thompson
  26. A Man Called Ove — Fredrik Backman
  27. The Great Gatsby — F. Scott Fitzgerald
  28. Revolutionary Road — Richard Yates
  29. The Catcher in the Rye — J.D. Salinger
  30. The Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling — Rudyard Kipling
  31. The Things They Carried — Tim O’Brien
  32. Heart of Darkness — Joseph Conrad
  33. Things Fall Apart — Chinua Achebe
  34. The Corrections — Jonathan Franzen
  35. Endurance — Alfred Lansing
  36. East of Eden — John Steinbeck
  37. Crime and Punishment — Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  38. The Stranger — Albert Camus
  39. Lord of the Flies — William Golding
  40. For Whom the Bell Tolls — Ernest Hemingway
  41. How to Win Friends and Influence People — Dale Carnegie
  42. When Breath Becomes Air — Paul Kalanithi
  43. Atlas Shrugged — Ayn Rand
  44. 1984 — George Orwell
  45. The Count of Monte Cristo — Alexander Dumas
  46. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator — Edwin Lefevre
  47. Oil! — Upton Sinclair
  48. The Grapes of Wrath — John Steinbeck
  49. The Holy Bible
  50. Don Quixote — Miguel de Cervantes
  51. Duluth — Gore Vidal
  52. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — Benjamin Franklin
  53. Killing Pablo — Mark Bowden
  54. Over The Edge Of The World — Laurence Bergreen
  55. American Psycho — Bret Easton Ellis
  56. Against the Gods — Peter Bernstein
  57. The Fountainhead — Ayn Rand
  58. Into Thin Air — Jon Krakauer
  59. The Maltese Falcon — Dashiell Hammett
  60. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance — Robert Pirsig
  61. Genealogy of Morals — Fried Nietzsche
  62. Fight Club — Chuck Palahniuk
  63. A People’s History of the United States — Howard Zinn
  64. Essential Manners for Men — Peter Post
  65. Thinking, Fast and Slow — Daniel Kahneman
  66. Thus Spoke Zarathustra — Friedrich Nietzsche
  67. Guns, Germs, and Steel — Jared M. Diamond
  68. The Republic — Plato
  69. A Short History of Nearly Everything — Bill Bryson
  70. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass
  71. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry — Neil deGrasse Tyson
  72. The Social Contract — Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  73. All Quiet on the Western Front — Erich Maria Remarqu
  74. The Wealth of Nations — Adam Smith
  75. The Theodore Roosevelt Trilogy — Edmund Morris
  76. On the Road — Jack Kerouac
  77. The Histories — Herodotus
  78. Ulysses — James Joyce
  79. The Prince — Niccolo Machiavelli
  80. Nicomachean Ethics — Aristotle
  81. The Naked and the Dead — Norman Mailer
  82. The Greatest Generation — Tom Brokaw
  83. A Tale of Two Cities — Charles Dickens
  84. The Sound and the Fury — William Faulkner
  85. Man’s Search for Meaning — Viktor Frankl
  86. Fear and Trembling — Soren Kierkegaard
  87. The Elements of Style — William Strunk, Jr
  88. Out of Africa — Isak Dinesen
  89. In Cold Blood — Truman Capote
  90. If This Is a Man — Primo Levi
  91. Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow
  92. Cognitive Psychology — E. Bruce Goldstein
  93. Common Sense and the Rights of Man — Thomas Paine
  94. Extraordinary Popular Delusions and The Madness of Crowds — Charles MacKay
  95. Den of Thieves — James B. Stewart
  96. The Divine Comedy — Dante Alighieri
  97. Into Africa — Martin Dugard
  98. One Hundred Years of Solitude — Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  99. Communist Manifesto — Karl Marx
  100. Sapiens — Yuval Noah Harari

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John LeFevre is the creator of @GSElevator, the founder of a fashion line, a podcast host, and the author of the New York Times bestselling book, Straight To Hell: True Tales of Deviance, Debauchery, And Billion-Dollar Deals, currently in development as a major motion picture.

John LeFevre

John LeFevre

Former banker (NYC, London, HK), social media character (GSElevator), and bestselling author (Straight To Hell)

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